Ashleigh Smith + photo

Ashleigh Smith

Apr 11
2 min read
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I love flowers! Chances are you do, too, if you are reading this. When planning out your flower garden, the focus is usually on balancing colors, heights, and light requirements. But have you put any thought into what plants do well together? Just like people tend to get along with other people of similar or specific personalities, flowers have friends too.

If you aren’t familiar with companion planting when it comes to your ornamental flowers, don’t worry. We have your back. Below I have included a list of flowers that grow well together, providing naturally stronger growth, pest control, and variety in your gardens.

Black-Eyed Susans: Coneflower (Echinacea), Cosmos, Daylilies, Shasta Daisy, or Phlox
Astilbe: Hosta, Ferns, Impatiens
Daylilies: Hydrangeas, Coneflower (Echinacea), Yarrow, Lavender
Iris: Phlox, Salvia, Poppy, Foxglove
Tulips: Hyacinth, daffodils, asters, Hostas
Daisies: Petunias, Bee Balm, Rudbeckia, Liatris, Lupine
Marigold: Lavender, Fruit Producing Plants

As these companion plants are known to be good for each other, you can also use this list to mix up your garden plans this coming season. Use the last of these cool months to plan your garden, collect your desired seed, and prep your soil. If you are working in small areas, we recommend amending your growing media with our new amended coco coir for nutrients and organic matter.

Become a True Leaf Market Brand Ambassador! You’ll enjoy awesome perks, free products and exclusive swag & offers! Help us create a gardening revolution and help others experience the joy of growing!

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2 comments

Diane

The Mustard seeds that we received from you have come up in my husbands garden. Yesterday, I cooked the first cuttings from the mustard and it was SO delicious. The leaves were perfect, so today my husband will cut double the amount and we will enjoy them again . Thank you very much


Susie D Perrone

in flowers for companion planting article, the flowers in the picture are not listed. What are they?


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