Andrew Stewart + photo

Andrew Stewart

Aug 31
2 min read
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wheatgrass powder in a spoon

Most of us have grown it, most of us have juiced it, and we love it for the crazy health benefits it gives us and our loved ones. I'm sure you've seen the capsuls and containers of dry wheatgrass powder. And lets be frank, it is easier to buy a container of wheatgrass powder than to grow it and juice it every day!

But what if you could make your own powder? One extra-large grow session a month and you could have a dry supply of wheatgrass! Without the morning harvest you can put a scoop in your favorite smoothie or add it do your baked goods!

How to make Wheatgrass Powder:

  • Harvest your trays by cutting your wheatgrass with a knife or scissors as close as you can to the soil. Usually 1/4"-1/2" above your grow medium.

  • Place your wheatgrass on a cooking sheet lined with parchment paper. This will dry out the blades of grass, spread the grass as evenly as possible to dry them out quickly. Bake at 130-145 degrees Fahrenheit for about an hour until it feels dry and crispy to the touch!
  • Take your dry grass and add it to your food processor or coffee grinder - whichever you have on hand. You want it to be as fine as possible, so switch your processor to a blunt blade, on a high setting - then you want to pulse the grass until it is a fine powder. it can be a bit coarse, it will still work for many of the recipes you want to try!

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