Ashleigh Smith + photo

Ashleigh Smith

Apr 25
2 min read
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Rhubarb is one plant that many people have had at least once is one plant that many people have had at least once, thanks to their grandmothers. But did you know it has a wide variety of uses? You can add it to anything from a drink to a dessert, salad, sauces, salsas, and cocktails. While my grandmother's strawberry rhubarb pie was delicious, I have come to like rhubarb in many other things.

Unlike many plants in your garden, rhubarb is a perennial that comes back year after year. It also does well in climates that experience a dormant period. When planning your garden, select a location where the rhubarb can be left with minimal disruption as you prepare your garden each spring.

To plant, select a full sun location with well-draining soil. After planting rhubarb, wait 1-2 years to harvest to allow your plant to become well-established. You can expect your rhubarb to reach about 3 feet in size. To promote healthy growth, plan on digging or dividing your plants every 3-4 years to encourage more growth.

How to Harvest Rhubarb:

To harvest rhubarb, simply cut, or pull and twist the red stalks rising from the soil. Immediately use a knife to remove the leaves of your harvested stalks. The leaves of rhubarb are not edible as they are toxic with a natural irritating chemical. If you will not use the stalks immediately, wrap them in plastic wrap or foil and refrigerate them. For long-term storage, cut into sections and freeze in an airtight bag. This method will last about a year.

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