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Backslop Romance | Fermentation, Inoculation, and Henrietta the Sourdough Starter

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Backslop Romance | Fermentation, Inoculation, and Henrietta the Sourdough Starter

These mason jar fermenting tips + tricks are brought to you by Marina Jade Phillips, Fermenter Extraordinaire and champion of our PickleHelix and Fermenting Lids.


The first two months of 2018 marked both my first trip to Mexico and my first bicycle tour. Living on two wheels did not slow my fermentation habit; I toted stainless steel jars of fermented vegetables in my panniers. I credit consuming lacto-bacteria with my lack of stomach troubles that can plague travelers in South America. Regularly introducing healthy bacteria into our digestive tract is a great way of inoculating our body with microbes that are on our team. The amount of attention pro-biotics have received in recent years is long overdue. Traditional cultures have known about the delicious and health-promoting qualities of fermented foods for hundreds of years, even before it was scientifically proven.


The 2018 Cyclecraut tour. Food and fermenting on the open road.


Backslop is Such Beautiful Word

Contamination and inoculation are two sides of the same food processing coin: the impact of a small quantity of the right or wrong material can be drastic. The former is the stuff of nightmares for food companies forced to recall tainted products, and suffering travelers perched atop or hunched over a toilet. The latter is how fermented flavors have been passed down through time, sometimes across generations, from one bottle, crock, or barrel to the next. Inoculation is so ubiquitous to the craft that traditional sausage makers gave it a name: backslop.

Backslop, unsavory as it may sound, simply refers to the practice of saving a bit of the last successful batch and incorporating it into the new one, ensuring a small number of the micro-organisms that populated the previous batch will go forth and multiply. There are several reasons why this technique is valuable to both professionals and home cooks. Foremost, the time required for complete fermentation decreases dramatically. A new jar of sliced cabbage or jug of fresh squeezed fruit juice is teeming with all kinds of bacteria and yeast, some of which will produce the desired results, and some of which will produce something inedible.

By introducing a healthy colony early in the process, desirable microbes get a head start and usually out compete less desirable ones in the race to inhabit a new environment. If those microbes have a particularly unique characteristic (champagne yeast produces more carbon dioxide than other wine yeasts, for instance), that character can be reproduced, sometimes leading to outstanding strains by which certain makers and regions become famous.


A 5-Year Love Affair

In more humble corners of the globe, far from French vineyards, I once had a relationship with a sourdough starter that lasted five years.

A sourdough culture becomes more complex with age, and as time went by she (yes, she—around her first birthday I named her Henrietta) developed her own unique flavor. One morning, I came into my kitchen and saw Henrietta’s container on the floor, licked almost all the way clean. A dog had gotten up on the counter, somehow removed the lid, and all but devoured my precious bread making ally. I scraped the dried crust of starter that remained from the edges of the bowl and rehydrated it with water.

Over the next few days I added a bit more flour and water at regular intervals, and in less than a week my robust friend was back in action. I could have sighed, cursed dogs under my breath, and made a new starter, but I was attached to Henrietta, and thrilled to revive her with such little material.

The beginning fermenter has a few options for ensuring success. Of course, there is always the option of simply hoping for the best. Usually, if the food to be fermented is fresh and healthy and the containers and hands in contact with it are clean, odds are in our favor that the microbes that make things sour and bubbly are going to win. However, a splash of the liquid floating around the top of high-quality yogurt (look for something with “active cultures”) will introduce a bit of the right bacteria and speed the process along. A small slosh of juice from a thoroughly fermented sauerkraut or brined vegetable jar will help get the next one going.


Apparently, I’m not the only one with a long-term relationship with a sourdough starter. This illustration by Bon appetit contributor Sophie Lucido Johnson is part of a Harlequin-esque story between the author and her sourdough starter, Paul. It is appropriately titled, “Love is Like a Sourdough Starter – It can Last Forever or Get Super Smelly and Weird.”


Those interested in experimenting with fermented dough will be delighted to know that a sourdough starter is incredibly easy to make: stir equal parts flour and water every day until it smells sour. Wild yeast lands on top of the mixture and is incorporated with every stirring.

Aid this process by dropping an unwashed and unsprayed berry (grapes work best) into the mixture for a couple of days (retrieve the berry before it starts breaking down). Yeast which covers the skins of all fruits will slough off and populate the latent starter. To keep this culture thriving, the sourdough baker saves a small amount of the starter and adds to it more flour and water. Starters exist that are rumored to be hundreds of years old, passed down in just this way.

Practice Safe Fermenting

Interestingly, foods that are not fermented are more prone to contamination from bacteria that can make us very ill, and in the worst cases, kill us. The culprits in large and small-scale food poisonings are often raw and unfermented vegetables. By fostering beneficial bacteria in a salty and acidic environment, we can safely enjoy raw vegetables with all their fiber and nutrient content without the risk of ingesting pathogens.

Begin fermenting your own foods right now with the Pickle Helix Fermenting Kit from Trellis + Co.!


Marina Jade Phillips

Fermenting Specialist, Interesting Human Being


Born in Alaska and raised in Colorado, Marina discovered the joys of fermentation in Philadelphia in 2005. She spent the last decade wrangling a homestead in Northern California, fermenting everything from tomatoes to beans. Currently, she is pedaling and eating her way thru Mexico on her first but probably not last bicycle tour, toting a violin and at least one jar of sauerkraut.

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  • Jordan Freytag
Comments 3
  • Mark Myers
    Mark Myers

    I have been making kraut for years. But this year saw me researching fermentation like never before. I have used fermentation to separate the juice from tomatoes, as well as the skins. Just 3 to 4 days does it. No cooking to death making sauce. And all that work was done with bacteria. I, too, discovered “inoculation”. Most kraut has too much salt. Inoculating your batch with brine from a previous batch dilutes the salt. Its also what I did with the tomato juice in succeeding batches of tomatoes. The juice is also a great tasting probiotic. It can also be frozen and stored in the freezer. I have been preserving cooked meat and shrimp in kraut as well.

  • Carlos Gasca Yanez
    Carlos Gasca Yanez

    Have a nice trip Marina.
    Cycling in Mexico, wow! Thanks for the great article.
    C

  • Maria G Garcia
    Maria G Garcia

    New to fermentation. Milk and water kefir, fermenting chicken feed… made sauerkraut once. My sourdough… questionable. This blog gives me some hope. Thanks.

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