Mountain Valley Seed Co. is your supplier of top quality beet seeds. We offer a great selection of beet seeds in packets all the way up to bulk quantities for commercial growers and farms... all at wholesale pricing.

We carry beet seeds in many options including heirloom, treated, non-treated, organic, hybrid and open pollinated.


Products 1-11 of 11
Beet Detroit Dark Red Garden Seed
Mountain Valley Seeds
Price: $1.59-$164.20
Availability: In Stock
Beet Seed Bulls Blood Seed
Mountain Valley Seeds
Price: $5.75-$445.50
Availability: In Stock
Beet Early Wonder Tall Top Seeds
Mountain Valley Seeds
Price: $1.59
Availability: Out of Stock
Beet Golden Detroit Garden Seed
Mountain Valley Seeds
Price: $1.15-$57.70
Availability: In Stock
Beet Cylindra Garden Seed
Mountain Valley Seeds
Price: $0.80-$39.13
Availability: In Stock
Beet Ruby Queen Garden Seed
Mountain Valley Seeds
Price: $4.05-$35.01
Availability: In Stock
Organic Chioggia Beet Planting Seed
Mountain Valley Seeds
Price: $1.25-$44.01
Availability: In Stock
Beet Chioggia Garden Seed
Mountain Valley Seeds
Price: $5.00-$96.25
Availability: In Stock
Beet Red Ace Hybrid Garden Seed
Mountain Valley Seeds
Price: $8.95-$208.75
Availability: In Stock
Beet - White Detroit
Mountain Valley Seeds
Price: $8.80-$57.70
Availability: In Stock
Beet - Detroit Mix - Organic
Mountain Valley Seeds
Price: $2.49
Availability: In Stock

Beets are commonly thought of as a root crop but some varieties of beet such as Bulls blood beet is grown every bit as much for the taste and beauty of its greens as the root, making the beet very versatile. Baby beets are also considered a culinary treasure. Like other root crops, beets need deep (at least 10 inches) loose and fertile soil to reach optimum size. In heavier soils grow only round varieties such as Detroit Dark Red longer varieties such as Cylindra could become deformed in such soil. Beets are cool weather crops so should be sown about four weeks prior to the last frost date or in the fall in warmer climates. Beet seeds are compound meaning that each seed pod contains up to six seeds but this does not improve germination. Because of this seeds should be sown on the heavy side (about an inch apart) thinning to two to three inches apart as they mature. Although for baby beets they should be sown closer together (10 to 15 per square foot) or grow them in clusters of three six inches apart. If you intend to save the seeds for future use grow only one variety of beets as they will cross pollinate.